AAA: Georgia motorists continue to see rise at the pump

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From AAA MEDIA SERVICES

Georgia gas prices continue to raise. Georgia motorists are now paying an average price of $3.24 per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline. Today’s state average is 9 cents more than a week ago, 25 cents more than last month and $1.26 more than this time last year.

It now costs motorists $48.60 to fill a 15-gallon tank of gasoline; that is $11.70 more than what motorists paid in January of 2020 when pump prices hit their peak of $2.46 per gallon.

Locally, GasBuddy reports today that BJ’s regular gas is at $3.14 per gallon, RaceTrac at $3.19 and Kroger also at $3.19 in the 30265 zip code.

In the 30263 zip code, the lowest gas can be found at Texaco, located at Corinth and Grantville Roads, at $3.05 and Marathon at Corinth and Potts Roads is $3.09.

In the 30277 zip code, Sam’s Club has regular gasoline at $2.99 per gallon and Cost at $3.04.

REGIONAL PRICES

Atlanta– $3.24

Most expensive Georgia metro markets – Savannah ($3.30), Brunswick ($3.28), and Hinesville-Fort Stewart ($3.26).

Least expensive Georgia metro markets – Catoosa-Dade-Walker ($3.12), Dalton ($3.17), and Augusta-Aiken ($3.18). 

“Crude oil continues to remain elevated, and pump prices are following suit because crude oil accounts for more than half of the price of a gallon of gas.” said Montrae Waiters, AAA-The Auto Club Group spokeswoman. “Regrettably, we can’t predict when Georgians will see relief at the pump.”

NATIONAL AVERAGE CONTINUES ASCENT AS CRUDE PRICES REMAIN ELEVATED

Since last Monday, the national average for a gallon of regular gasoline has increased by 7 cents to $3.38. According to data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), total domestic gasoline stocks decreased by 5.4 million barrels to 217.7 million barrels last week. However, gasoline demand increased from 9.19 million barrels a day to 9.63 million barrels a day. With the US economy recovering from the depths of the pandemic, demand for gas has gone up, but supply is tight. Higher demand coupled with a decline in stocks, alongside elevated crude prices, has put upward market pressure on pump prices. Pump prices will likely rise as long as crude prices remain high — above $80 per barrel. 

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